One.

I believe it’s really important to be a multi-faceted person.

From my observations *adjusts glasses*, it seems that many individuals define themselves by one trait.

For example — If one is intelligent, they constantly have to live up to their “smart diagnosis”. There’s a constant weight on their shoulders to live up to other people’s expectations of them. They have to be informed, they must be ready to answer, they have to find all types of learning easy breezy and uncomplicated, they have to solve everyone’s problems — and the list goes on.

Or how about if someone is funny? They always have to keep the jokes coming. You’ve seen it before — A comedian goes onto a late night talk show as him or herself and everyone is on the edge of their seat just waiting for them to bust out into comedic gold. And when they’re just being “normal”, everyone begins commenting about how disappointing the interview was and how this person wasn’t what or whom they expected them to be. The same thing happens between us mere mortals as well. 😉

Outgoing? They have to be the life of the party. Bring them along to the gathering to razzle and dazzle the crowd all evening.

And if someone is beautiful, they always have to look as if perfection is their natural state. By all means necessary, they cannot be seen without makeup and their hair done, with textured skin and acne, or with puffy eyes and dark circles, because then the world would label them as “ugly”, a living breathing false advertisement, and “sooo different looking” instead of just human.

So much pressure is placed on us to fulfill our “perfect” characteristic. And to be frank, the only way we can teach others that we are a blend of many things, is to reject being categorized as one.

Because we are never just one thing. And we certainly don’t always feel like being that one thing.

We’re a multitude of different qualities that need to have the space to flourish and expand. And if we’re constantly adhering to our one shtick because that’s what we or other people have become accustomed to viewing us as, we won’t be able to grow into who we are meant to become.

For me? I like stuff. I love luxury and designer brands. Expensive, quality material possessions make me happy.

But I also really like catching moon jellyfish by the ocean, walking barefoot in forests, and admiring vegetable gardens. Hippie stuff makes me feel more alive than anything else in this world.

Additionally, I like talking about many different topics that have no correlation to each other. These can range from pop culture to intersectional feminism to home remedies, and beyond.

I allow my personality to be a perfect combination of everything I know in my heart is true. My hopes is that other people do the same for themselves.

 

Two.

I’m strong for myself but very, very tender when it comes to other living beings. I feel compassion for a tree getting cut down. I immediately absorb someone’s energy as I walk by them on the street. The dog who’s getting pulled on his leash a little too hard because the owner doesn’t seem to have the time of day to let him/her explore its surroundings.

My heart breaks pretty much every day.

There has been many, many times in my life where I have felt guilty for being happy, knowing that there is so much injustice and suffering in the world. I still feel this pain greatly every day, and the only thing that helps me overcome this state of mind is the hope that someday I’ll be able to make a positive impact in other people’s lives.

 

Three.

I was really, really horrible in school. I was constantly overwhelmed by the work I didn’t want to do and the questions that never made sense to me. I would read everything over and over again with no success, and just feel the frustration swallow me whole. I started receiving B’s, and B-‘s in around grade 6 and it only went downhill from there.

Now, I’m sure you can imagine what these grades do to a child’s opinion of their own intelligence and self-worth. It didn’t help that teachers, in turn, would become frustrated at me for not following through with my studies.

I hope one day the education system operates differently. Instead of being focused on solely good grades, the focus would become on helping other students retain the information by explaining the work in different ways for the visual, auditory, and kinaesthetic learners.

 

Four.

I’m a very touch-y feel-y type of person. I realize that many people aren’t comfortable with physical contact (especially from a stranger) but it really feels like something I can’t control, despite my best abilities to do so. While I’m talking to someone, chances are I’ll put my hand on their shoulder every now and then. If someone makes me laugh, I’ll touch them on the arm. If I’m meeting up with a friend, I’ll hug them. When we separate, I’ll hug them again.

But really, the true aha moment for me was when I went into a makeup store and the friendly girl that worked there and I got to talking. She had made a joke, I laughed, and then I PROCEEDED TO POKE HER IN THE BELLY. What. the. actual. hell. Thankfully she didn’t seem bothered by it and we ended up talking for another 20 minutes, but don’t you for one second think that I wasn’t completely abashed, dear reader. I left that store completely SMH-ing at myself.

 

Five.

I’m hypersensitive to caffeine.

I always seem to get this huge spurt of energy within the first hour of consuming caffeine, but anything beyond that — I basically feel like I’m dying. Even consuming more than 2 cups of green tea puts me into a state of anxiousness. And it’s always accompanied by extreme jitters, heart palpitations, insomnia, and chest pain. No fun.

So, if you ever hear me talking about coffee, what I really mean is I’m drinking decaf. #Fraud

 

Your turn! Tell me something no one knows about you in the comment section below. 🙂